Less Than Pore-fect: Treating Enlarged Pores

12th May, 2018
|
Blog

If there’s one adage that the modern age has disproved, it’s that the camera never lies. We now know that filters, Photoshop and sneaky lighting can hide a multitude of sins, but there’s one flaw it can expose – and that’s large, open or congested pores. Thanks to the widespread availability of high-definition cameras, many of us have clicked on a tagged close-up of ourselves on Instagram or Facebook and been shocked to see a multitude of tiny craters speckled over our nose, forehead, cheeks or chin – but how can we get rid of them?

As a foremost Harley Street cosmetic clinic, we get plenty of patients through Revere’s doors looking for solutions – so here’s everything you need to know about this common, persistent problem.

What causes large pores?

We all have facial pores, but their visibility is determined by three main factors: skin type, age and gender [1]. The oilier your skin, the more sebum you produce and the larger your pores will appear – while ageing causes decreased elasticity around your pores, making them sag and look larger. Men have more visible pores than women, due to having an increased number of hair follicles, and race has also been determined as a factor in some studies [2]. There’s little you can do about your age, biological gender, skin type or ethnic background, but there are a number of measures you can take to reduce the appearance of pores.

Tackling large pores with skincare

A good skincare regime is essential for reducing the appearance of pores – oil, dead skin cells and dirt can all settle around your pores, making them look even larger. Blackheads can also form if large, open pores, get blocked with dirt and makeup. This build-up creates a plug called a comedo, the surface of which darkens due to oxidization [3], resulting in a small, unpleasant dark bump, which draws even more attention to the area.

Thoroughly cleansing your skin twice a day to eliminate this build-up is a core component of reducing the appearance of pores. Despite the often-accepted wisdom that oil should be kept away from pores at all costs, oil cleansing can be fantastic for pulling the sebum out of clogged pores [4]. Use a non-comedogenic oil such as Argan oil, paired with a light foaming cleanser afterwards, to ensure your skin is cleansed of any lingering residue [5]. Regular exfoliation can also help to reduce the appearance of pores by sloughing off the dead skin cells, which can stretch pores open – try one of Revere’s prescription retinoids, or manually exfoliate using a gentle scrub.

Reducing pore size with aesthetic treatments

At Revere, we offer a number of treatments which can help to reduce pore size. Microneedling with Genuine Dermaroller™/Dermastamp is ideal for ageing, large pores or acne-scarred skin. By creating tiny punctures in the skin (microdamage), we can harness the skin’s own powers of regeneration, triggering collagen production and resurfacing the skin. With minimal downtime (significant redness and photosensitivity will persist for a couple of days) Dermaroller renews and thickens the upper layers of the skin.

Laser treatments are also effective in treating visible pores. At Revere, we recommend EndyMed 3D Fractional Skin Resurfacing – like microneedling, the EndyMed system regenerates skin cells by creating thousands of tiny channels within the skin, provoking the skin’s natural healing response and stimulating new collagen and elastin. This reduces the appearance of pores by addressing the lack of elasticity at the edges of pores which causes them to gape and appear larger. Firming, tightening and, as the name suggests, resurfacing, EndyMed simultaneously addresses sagging, roughness, lines and scars.

Request a complimentary consultation with one of Revere’s experienced aesthetic physicians today to find out which of our treatments can best address the cause of your large pores – and prepare to smile for your close-up!

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26918966
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337418/
[3] http://www.healthline.com/health/blackheads#prevention6
[4] https://thebestorganicskincare.com/a-list-of-non-comedogenic-facial-oils
[5] https://www.peachandlily.com/collections/cleansers

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]
Enquire now